By Steve Eulberg, for Hammered Dulcimer Players in the Key of A

Video 13



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VideoAbout the Lessons

1. Demonstration Steve demonstrates this Old-Time Tune in A.
2. Source and Description Steve explains the roots of this tune.
3. A Part Here Steve plays through the first part of this tune.
4. Tapping out the Crooked Part Using our hands, Steve demonstrates why we call this tune crooked (and why old time players may not!)
5. B Part Next we learn play the B part of the tune.
6. A and B Part Together Now it is time to put both parts together.
7. A Part Slower In case the previous tempo was too quick for you, here is the A Part played slower.
8. B Part Slower And here is the B part played much slower.
9. 8vb In this video, Steve shows how to play the melody in a lower octave.
10. 8vb Lower Still Using his extended range dulcimer, Steve plays the tune in an even lower octave.
11. Using Dampers In the lower octave, sometimes using the dampers helps to clarify the melody, and emphasize the chord changes.
12. Adding Bass Notes The only way that Steve adds to this tune is to add some bass notes (in various locations).
13. Conclusion Steve plays the tune with the added bass notes up to speed.

PDFSheet Music

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Music GlobeExtras

  • Legend has it that a certain fiddler fell in love with a young lady whom he saw repeatedly at the local dances. As he was providing the music, the fiddler could never seem to strike up an acquaintance with her. He noticed, however, that the girl would stray from one fellow to another, so he likened her to a 'wild rose of the mountain' and composed this tune for her.

  • This is an old traditional fiddle tune. Another version of Wild Rose of the Mountain was written by Si Kahn, and these are his lyrics.

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