By Steve Eulberg for Hammered Dulcimer Players

Video 1



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VideoAbout the Lessons

1. Introduction Rich chords are chords that have other notes in them, in addition to the 3 notes that go with either the major or the minor chords. Steve begins by explaining the basis or construction of major and minor chords.
2. Suspensions When you take away the 3rd note, and replace it with the 2nd or 4th note in that key, the chord is called suspended. This is indicated in the chord box with a "sus." A suspended chord can be resolved to either a major or a minor chord.
3. Adding a 4th Note
Major 7th chord

If we add the 7th tone to the top of the chord, this forms the Major 7th chord. When you start on a marked course and play what Steve calls the "small box," the result is a major 7th chord.
4. Adding a 4th Note
Dominant 7th Chord
The dominant 7th chord is useful when playing the "blues. With this chord, the 4th note is 1/2 step lower than for the major 7th chord.
5. Adding a 4th Note
6th Chords

For this chord, you will play the 1st, 3rd, 5th, and 6th tones of the scale.
6. Adding a 4th Note
Augments & Diminished
An augmented chord means raising the 5th step of the chord. A diminished chord is formed by lowering both the 3rd and 5th tone of the chord. All of these chords can be played ALL over the instrument, and Steve encourages you to do that.

PDFSheet Music

Music GlobeExtras

  • For more information on the dominant 7th chord, check out Video 2 from the "You Name It Blues" lesson for hammered dulcimer players.

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