For Hammered Dulcimer Players

Video 1



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VideoAbout the Lessons

1. You Name It Blues: Intro Steve introduces his original tune, the “You Name It Blues” to demonstrate a common 12-bar blues form.
2. You Name It Blues: Chords The power of the dominant 7th chord to set up tension that wants to be resolved by going back home, to “Do” is very easily felt. The dominant 7th chord is a 4-note chord and when we start on a marked course and use the ladder shape, we can find it in several places on the instrument!
3. Blues Scale in G Building on the minor pentatonic scale (1 b3 4 5 b7) we can add the b5 (diminished 5th) to get to the notes that make up the blues scale. Steve demonstrates an easy pattern to find this in the D minor box.
4. You Name It Blues: Melody Using the notes of the G blues scale, we can play a singular melody while the chords change beneath the melody. We also learn 2 different patterns for playing this.
5. You Name It Blues Put Together Here we put both duet parts together and play the tune as a solo, taking turns with melody and chords and letting the dulcimer ring while the other part plays.
6. A Rhythmic Change: Leaning Forward This tune takes on a different character if we “lean forward” rhythmically and give is a Chicago-Blues feel, rather than a laid-back Delta blues feel.
7. You Name It Blues in a Higher Octave On instruments with an extended range, we can play this tune as a solo in a higher octave as well. Only one adjustment to the chord shape, and a new 3-bridge pattern for playing the melody are necessary.

PDFTablature

  • You Name It Blues: Solo
  • You Name It Blues: Duet
  • A Typical 12-Bar Blues Form
  • Dominant 7th Chords

AnimationAnimations

  • You Name It Blues: Melody
  • You Name It Blues: Backup
  • You Name It Blues: Solo

For Mobile Devices

  • You Name It Blues: Melody
  • You Name It Blues: Backup
  • You Name It Blues: Solo

Music GlobeExtras

  • History of the Blues

  • Here is Stephen Seifert playing the "Carrol County Blues" on mountain dulcimer.

  • The blues translate to any language as seen in this video with Balu der Barde playing the "Dulcimer Blues" on an Electric Mountain Dulcimer.


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